News

TIME To Plant

TIME To Plant

Time to order and sow Onions, Leeks, Parsley, Celeriac and Celery

It's finally time to start preparing and seeding spring crops! Between now and the middle of February, we'll be starting to sow our onions, leeks, early-spring scallions, parsley, celery and celeriac. All these crops need a long, loving start to be glorious during the spring, summer, fall and even next winter.

 

Ventura Celery

Flowers Growing Info

 

Annual Flowers
Variety Indoor Sowing Date Days to Max Germination Soil Temp F° Planting Depth Weeks to Transplant
Ageratum 
Alyssum 
Amaranthus 
Aster 
Bachelor Button 
Baby’s Breath 
Celosia 
Coleus 
Cosmos 
Daisies 
Geraniums 
Impatiens 
Marigolds 
Moon flower 
Morning Glory 
Nasturtium 
Pansy 
Petunia 
Salvia 
Sun flower 
Sweet Pea 
Vinca 
Zinnias
Dec-Mar 
Dec-Mar 
Dec-Mar 
Jan-Apr 
Feb-Mar 
Feb-Mar 
Jan-Apr 
Dec-Mar 
Jan-Apr 
Feb-Mar 
Nov-Feb 
Dec-Mar 
Jan-Apr 
Feb-Mar 
Feb-Mar 
Feb-Mar 
Nov-Feb 
Dec-Mar 
Dec-Mar 
Feb-Mar 
Feb-Mar 
Dec-Mar 
Jan-Apr


14 



10 
10 


4-10 
15 




16 
10 
15 


15 
7
75-78 
78-82 
68-70 
70-75 
68-70 
68-72 
70-80 
70-75 
68-72 
70-75 
70-75 
68-72 
70-80 
70-75 
70-75 
70-74 
55-65 
70-80 
75-78 
70-80 
70-75 
70-80 
68-72
1/8” 
1/6" 
1/2” 
1/8" 
1/4” 
1/4" 
1/8” 
1/4" 
1/4” 
1/4” 
1/2” 
1/8” 
1/8" 
1/4” 
1/4” 
1/2” 
1/8” 
top 
1/10” 
1” 
1” 
1/4" 
1/8”
8-10 
10-12 
7-9 

4-6 
6-8 

6-9 

5-6 
14-16 
10-12 
6-9 
6-8 
4-5 

6-10 
10 

N/A 
4-6 
12 
5-8

Perennial Flowers
 Variety  Planting Depth  Indoor Sowing Date  Outdoor Sowing Date Soil Temp F°   Height" Spread"  Soil Light 
Achillea 
Black Eyed Susan 
Blanket Flower 
Butter y Flower 
Candytuft 
Cone flower 
Coreopsis 
Dahlia 
Daisies 
Delpinium 
Dianthus 
Foxglove 
Geraniums 
Hosta 
Hollyhock 
Lupine 
Penstemon 
Phlox 
Poppy 
Primrose 
Rudbeckia 
Tansy 
Viola
1/8” 
1/4” 
1/8" 
1/8” 
1/8” 
1/4" 
1/8” 
1/8” 
1/8" 
1/8” 
1/8" 
1/8” 
1/8” 
1/2” 
1/8" 
1/8” 
Top 
1/8” 
3/8" 
1/8” 
1/4” 
1/4" 
1/8”
6-8 
N/A 

6-8 
6-8 
N/A 
N/A 
6-8 
N/A 

6-8 
N/A 
6-10 
6-10 
6-8 
N/A 
6-8 
6-8 
6-8 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
6-8
Early 
Anytime 
1-4 after 
1-4 after 
Early 
Early 
1-4 after 
Early 
Early 
1-4 after 
Early 
Early 
1-4 after 
Early 
Early 
2-4 after 
2-6 
Early 
Anytime 
Early 
Anytime 
Early 
Early
60 
60 
70 
70 
65 
70 
70 
65 
60 
60 
70 
65 
70 
70 
65 
70 
70 
60 
60 
60 
60 
65 
65
24-36” 
24-36” 
24-40” 
24-36” 
1-15” 
24-42” 
18-48” 
12-36" 
12-36” 
12-48” 
18-24” 
24-60" 
6-36” 
24-40" 
48-72” 
24-36” 
12-36" 
6-18” 
24-30” 
8-15” 
24-36” 
36-48” 
4-8”
18” 
18” 
14-16” 
18-20” 
8-10” 
12-18” 
6” 
16-24" 
8-20” 
18” 
10-12” 
24" 
6-20” 
24-40" 
18-24” 
12-14” 
18" 
8-10” 
8-18” 
12-18” 
12-24” 
6” 
6”
Average, well-drained 
Average 
Loose 
Sandy, well-drained 
Well-drained 
Well-drained 
Moist 
Rich, fertile 
Rich,well-drained 
Average 
Rich, well-drained 
Average 
Any soil 
Well-drained 
Rich, well-drained 
Average 
Loose soil 
Rich, loose 
Any soil 
Rich, moist 
Average 
Average 
Average
Full 
Full 
Full 
Partial 
Partial 
Full 
Full/Partial
Full 
Full 
Full/Partial
Full 
Full/Partial
Full/Partial
Partial 
Full/Partial
Full/Partial
Full 
Full 
Full/Partial
Full/Partial
Full 
Full/Partial
Partial

 

When summer ends: preserving summer bulbs

Summer-flowering Bulbs

Semi-tropical natives such as dahlias, gladioli, begonias, canna, caladium, elephant ears, oxalis and other tender summer-flowering bulbs will not make it through the winter outside of the warmest climate zones.

Tender bulbs can be either treated as annuals and composted or tossed out, or they can be lifted and stored. This depends solely on your preference. Some gardeners can’t be bothered (and some bulbs are inexpensive). Others love to baby their bulbs and tuck them away for the winter.

For those who like to keep their bulbs from year to year:

  • Tender summer bulbs should be left in the ground until frost blackens the foliage. (This is true for all except tuberous begonias, which should be dealt with before frost.)
  • Carefully dig up the bulbs, being careful not to damage them. Cut off excess foliage and brush off loose soil. Set the bulbs out in a warm, dry place with good air circulation to dry for a day or two. When dry, brush off remaining soil, being careful not to bruise the bulbs when handling, as this promotes mold.
  • After the bulbs are dry, cut off any remaining foliage and pack the bulbs in a few layers of an appropriate "medium" such as perlite, vermiculite, cocoa hulls, clean sawdust or peat moss.
  • Store in a container, with layers of bulbs separated by your medium of choice in a dry place until spring. Optimal storage temperatures vary for different bulbs, but typically range just under or over 50° degrees. Don’t worry yourself needlessly — few people have temperature-controlled storage areas — store your bulbs as best you can.

A few notes: dahlia stems may have water in them. Hang them upside down to drain. When digging gladioli, you'll notice that the shriveled old corm is there, replaced by new corms. Separate the corms. Out with the old and store the new.

Remember, not all summer-blooming bulbs are tender. Lilies, for example, are winter hardy. So are alliums. Hardy summer bulbs, like most of their spring-blooming cousins, are perennial performers and can overwinter in the garden.

Storage Temperature for Summer Bulbs

For storage, temperatures and moisture conditions vary for each type of bulb. For some bulbs, the precise storage conditions are known, for others not.  When grown in containers, it is usually best to keep bulbs in the pot and store the pot under the correct conditions.  Here are some tips by variety: 

Achimenes - Leave rhizomes in container, dry out planting medium, and place at 60-70° F (16-21°C).

Agapanthus - Two overwintering options are possible, depending on the variety. They are:

1.Leave fleshy rhizomes in container with slightly moist planting medium and place at 35 to 55°F (2-13°C).

2.Place container in cool. 35 to 55°F [2-13°C], greenhouse and water sparingly during the winter. Return to growing area in spring.

Amaryllis belladonna - Store bulbs in container at 55 to 70°F (13- 21°C).

Anemone coronaria (St. Brigid and De Caen) - Store tubers dry at 50 to 55°F (10-13°C).

Begonia (Tuberous Hybrids) - Harvest the corms in fall, and store in dry peat at 35 to 40°F (2-5°C).

Canna - Harvest rhizomes in fall, and store in dry peat or vermiculite at 40 to 50°F (5-10°C).

Crinum - Store bulbs in slightly moist sand at 35 to 45°F (2-7°C). If grown indoors in a container, place in a bright, cool [55°F, 13°C] night temperature room.

Crocosmia (syn. Montbretia) - Store corms in peat or vermiculite at 35 to 40°F (2- 5°C).

Dahlia - Harvest tuberous roots in fall, keep away from drafts, and store in vermiculite or dry sand at 35 to 45°F (2-7°C).

Eucomis - Store bulbs dry at 55 to 58°F (13-20°C).

Freesia - Store corms or containers dry at 75 to 85°F (25-30°C).

Galtonia - Store bulbs dry in vermiculite at 60 to 75°F (17-23°C).

Gladiolus - Harvest corms after foliage dies. Store dry in mesh bags 40 to 50°F (5-13 °C). ]

Gladiolus callianthus (syn. Acidanthera bicolor) - Harvest corms in the fall, dry, clean carefully, and store at 55 to 70°F (13-20°C).

Haemanthus - Bring containers indoors and either store dry or continue growing at 55 to 65°F (13-18°C).  

Hymenocallis - Place container-grown plants indoors and grow them at 55 to 65°F (13-18°C). To store unplanted bulbs, harvest them carefully leaving soil around the roots, and store dry at 60 to 70°F (16-21°C).

Ixia - Store corms dry at 68 to 75°F (20-25°C).

Liatris - Store corms in moist peat at 35°F (2°C).

Lilium - Better to leave in the ground, but can be stored in moist peat at 35°F (2°C).

Nerine - Store bulbs dry or in container with ventilation at 35°F (2°C).

Ornithogalum (Tender Species) - Store bulbs dry at 70 to 80°F 21-27°C.

Oxalis (Tender Species) - Store rhizomes or bulbs in peat or vermiculite at 35 to 40°F (2-5°C).

Ranunculus - Store tuberous roots dry at 50 to 55°F (10-13°C).

Sandersonia aurantiaca - Store tubers in vermiculite at 55°F (13°C).

Schizostylis - If stored place rhizomes in moist peat at 45°F (7°C). However, it is preferable to let them perennialize.

Sparaxis - Store corms dry at 65 to 75°F (20-25°C).

Sprekelia - Store bulbs dry in peat or vermiculite at 40 to 55°F (5-13°C).

Tigridia - Store bulbs in peat or vermiculite at 35 to 40°F (2-5°C).

Veltheimia - If possible, do not store bulbs. If stored, keep dry at 75°F(25°C). When bulbs are in containers, take indoors for winter at 50 to 60°F (10-16°C). Blooms in February.

Zantedeschia (Calla Lilies) - Store rhizomes or tubers dry at 50 to 60°F (10- 16°C). Take care not to injure the storage organs.

Zephyranthes - Store bulbs in peat or vermiculite at 50 to 60°F (10-16°C).

Courtesy of the International Flower Bulb Center (www.bulb.com)

When to plant seeds

When to plant seeds
The recommendations below are given only as a general guideline and are based on the Northeast United States - consult your county extension office or university for information on your local area.
CROP
APPROXIMATE PLANTING DATE
Beans
May 15 - July 15
Beets
April 15 - August 1
Carrots
April 15 - August 1
Sweet Corn
May 1 - June 10
Swiss Chard
May 1 - August 1
Cucumber
May 15 - July 20
Herbs
March 1 - June 1
Lettuce - head
April 10 - June 20
Lettuce - leaf
April 10 - July 15
Onions
April 20 - May 15
Peas
April 1 - May 1 & August 1 - 20
Peppers
March 10 - 25 (start indoors)
May 20 - June 10 (transplant outdoors)
Radishes
April 1 - May 1 & August 15 - Sept. 15
Spinach
April 1 - September 15
Squash
May 15 - June 15
Tomato
March 15 - April 10 (start indoors)
May 15 - June 1 (transplant outdoors)

Vegetable Garden Planning

Vegetable Garden Planning
Gardening is enjoyable, especially if you love to eat what you grow. No one can produce a tastier tomato than you, so start dreaming of the freshest vegetables you'll ever eat.
How Much is Enough?
The size of your garden is determined by the available sunny space (vegetables require full sun), amount of energy and time available for gardening, the size of your family, and your interest in canning or freezing. Some varieties produce more than you'd expect, so check the chart on the back for guidance. For many people, especially first-timers, a small garden (20' x 30') makes sense. It will be easier to keep in good condition and you'll be less likely to become overwhelmed by it.
Location
Choose a sunny site with fertile soil and nearby water, away from towering trees and out of the wind. A site close to your back door will make it easier to tend. The shape of the garden may be a simple square, rectangle or any shape that takes advantage of sun and well-drained, fertile soil. Some gardeners creatively plant vegetables in flower borders and landscape beds. In areas where the soil is poor, improve the texture by adding compost, manure or peat moss. Also test the soil to determine whether you need to add lime before planting to reduce the acidity. Soil pH should be 6.5 for most vegetables, 5.5 for potatoes.
Plan Before You Plant
Always garden on paper before you start digging in the ground - it'll save you time, money and energy. Start by listing your family's favorite vegetables. Cool-season crops such as peas, onions, spinach, carrots, broccoli and cabbage can be planted first. Once there is no more chance of frost, plant such warm-season types as tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers and eggplants. Increase your yields by replanting areas used for short-season vegetables (peas, spinach, lettuce, etc.) with a second crop such as green beans or late carrots. Vegetables can be arranged in single rows, wide rows or blocks. Rows should run north to south, with the taller vegetables at the north end and the shorter ones at the south end. Use trellises and containers and interplant crops to save space. Use space efficiently, but make sure the plants have enough room to grow properly.
7 Tips for Planning a Vegetable Garden
1. Grow What You Eat List your favorite vegetables and herbs.
2. Plan on Paper Sketch your garden plan on graph paper and include your list of vegetables. Arrange crops in rows and blocks. Check spacing for each vegetable and keep onions, tomatoes, peppers and eggplants in the brightest sun. Tuck lettuce, spinach, radishes, even parsley and mint, in less sun.
Gardening takes time and energy, so keep the size of the vegetable garden in proportion to your available time. Small, well-managed plots with successive plantings often produce more than large gardens that are overridden with weeds.
3. Schedule Crops For Three Seasons Plan spring, summer and fall plantings to make the best use of the garden space. For example, replant an early spring row of peas or spinach with green beans or late carrots. Successive, small plantings provide top quality and bounty with little waste.
Spring Crops
Onions
Chives
Swiss Chard
Beets
Peas
Spinach
Broccoli
Lettuce
Carrots
Radishes
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Parsley
Turnips
Brussels Sprouts
Summer Crops (after there is no chance to frost)
Tomatoes
Peppers
Sage
Cucumbers
Eggplants
Melons
Sweet Potatoes
Sweet Corn
Beans
Basil
Dill
Pumpkins
Rosemary
Lavendar
Fall Crops (will tolerate light frost)
Beets
Lettuce
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Broccoli
Chinese Cabbage
Kale
Carrots
Parsley
Radishes
Swiss Chard
Spinach
4. Select A Site Select a level garden site with well-drained soil, plenty of sun (at least 8 hours) and a nearby water source.

How To Grow Hot Pepper Seeds

How To Grow Hot Pepper Seeds

 

Sowing Instructions

 

There are multiple ways to start growing your pepper seeds.
I will now tell you the way we are growing our peppers. This may be somewhat different to the instructions you find searching the web, but we are highly successful with our method.

Things you need
First you need a warm place, a mini green house with heating, or a box where you can hold constant temperatures between 77-86°F (25-30°C) in the first stage of propagation. Anything below this range will give you unsufficient results or no germination if it´s cold enough. You need a commercial propagation substrate on turf basis, Perlite, Vermiculite, plastic pots and glass plates to cover the pots.

Soak the seeds
Seeds are soaked in warm water for two days with one change after 24h. If the seeds tend to float add a very low amount of dish washer to the water. This will enhance water uptake, as the seeds have some oil at the surface repelling water.
In order to avoid bacterial growth, we recommend to add hydrogen peroxide to the water. There are small bottels with a 3% (w/v) solution available in drug stores or pharmacies (https://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=73864). Use 9 parts of water and 1 part of hydrogen peroxide solution (final delution should be 0.3% of hydrogen peroxide). Hard to germinate seeds like some Capsicum chinense or Capsicum annuum varieties can be pretreated with a 2% (w/v) saltpeter solution at a maximum of 24h.
<
Potting the seeds
Prepare a mixture of 2 parts of commercial propagation substrate and one part of Perlite and one part of Vermiculite. Use clean plastic pots 8cm (3 inch) and fill 2/3 of the volume with your propagation mix (4-5 spoons).
Press down the substrate with a spoon or a punch prepared from wood.
Distribute the presoaked seeds on the surface an cover with a spoon of substrate. Then set the pot into a bowl with some inches of warm water and led soak until the surface gets dark.
Now cover your pot with the with the glass plate and put into your propagation box or mini green house set at 29°C. Until the seeds have sprouted, no light is needed.
Inspect your pots daily and remove all pots where the seeds have spouted.
First weeks Pots with sprouted seeds are put at a somewhat cooler place (room temperature) under fluorescent light.
Use tubes with the 865 specification that produce pure white light, this will give you compact growth with dark green leaves. If you use more red light you will get unwanted early lengthy growth with unstable plants.
First transplant After the second pair of true leaves has developed, it´s time to transplant the seedlings to single pots. Use the same mixture as above, keep the young plants at somewhat lower temperatures (about 75°F) under good light but avoid direct sunlight in the first week after transplantation. Then adopt to sunlight and lower humidity. Any type of potassium enriched fertilizer will now help to setup a very good rooting and compact, green growth.

Tips for Harvesting and Storing Sweet Potatoes

Tips for Harvesting and Storing Sweet Potatoes

When to Harvest Sweet Potatoes
Sweet Potatoes may be dug in early fall as soon as the tubers reach a good size. But don't hurry. The longer Sweet Potatoes stay in the ground, the larger and sweeter they get. It's best to wait until the leaves start to yellow or frosty weather is approaching. (Should the vines get frosted, it's important to harvest immediately.)
 
  Harvest Sweet Potatoes from right at the base of the plant, just barely under the ground. If the soil is relatively loose, you can simply brush it away to reveal the tubers. If your soil is heavier, use a garden fork to dig down and loosen the soil, then lift the tubers up out of the ground. 
 
  When a Sweet Potato first comes out of the ground, its skin is very thin and it can be easily nicked or bruised. Handle the tubers as gently as eggs, transferring them carefully to a bin that's been lined with burlap or an old blanket. Move the potatoes out of the sun into a warm, dry location and lay them out in a single layer, so the skins can dry for a week or so.
  Once your Sweet Potatoes  have been cured, nestle them into a box, allowing plenty of room for good air circulation. For storage, an air temperature of 55° to 60°F is perfect, with a humidity level of 75% to 80%. A cool, dry basement usually works fine.
Our affection for Sweet Potatoes grew when we learned they are almost twice as nutritious as any other vegetable. High in vitamin C as well as calcium, folate, potassium and beta-carotene (which the body converts to vitamin A), Sweet Potatoes are also an excellent source of dietary fiber, protein and iron. And, though they are sweet, Sweet Potatoes have half the glycemic load of white Potatoes. They are a good carb that our bodies digest slowly, so we feel satisfied far longer than with most other foods.

 

Growing a Medicinal Herb Garden: How to Start Seeds

ddd

<div class="tumblr-post" data-href="https://embed.tumblr.com/embed/post/Y-WFzrLsngF19mYVhksILA/113364641980" data-did="9b4f1580d992056696fe9d984b35006e42f45f6f"><a href="http://honeycoyote.tumblr.com/post/113364641980/growing-a-medicinal-herb-garden-how-to-start">http://honeycoyote.tumblr.com/post/113364641980/growing-a-medicinal-herb-garden-how-to-start</a></div> <script async src="https://assets.tumblr.com/post.js"></script>

Check my other channel

Check my other channel
<a href="//www.etsy.com/shop/CaribbeanGarden?ref=offsite_badges&utm_source=sellers&utm_medium=badges&utm_campaign=en_isell_1"><img width="200" height="200" src="//img0.etsystatic.com/site-assets/badges/en/en_isell_1.png"></a>

Direct Sow Seeds

Direct Sow Seeds

Direct Sow Seeds

Sow these seeds directly into the garden and watch them take off. Direct sow seeds are easier to start outdoors than other seeds. Known for high germination rates and fast growing habits. These warm-season vegetables take little effort to start and produce high yields of lettuce, beans, cucumber, squash, peas and more.

Shop By Department

Bean Seeds Beets Carrots Chard Corn Seed Cucumbers Garlic Bulbs for Sale Gourds Greens Lettuce Seeds Melons Pea Seeds Peanut Seeds Pumpkins Radish Spinach Squash Watermelons

Our brands