Tormentil (potentilla Erecta) Seeds- aka Bloodroot,Tormentil. Perennial Herb.

$ 1.95
SKU P12386S
Size

 Herb gardens, cottage gardens, rock gardens or border fronts.
Slender cinquefoil is an important nectar/pollen source honey bees, butterflies and other insects.This flowering plant is great in ornamental gardens, especially butterfly gardens. Deer are not fond of them.
Potentilla erecta is a herbaceous perennial plant belonging to the rose family.Containing more tannin than oak bark, all parts of tormentil are strongly astringent, finding use wherever that action is required.
This plant is considered to be one of the safest native astringents and it is widely used in herbal medicine in the treatment of diarrhoea, dysentery, sore throats etc. The whole plant, and especially the root, is antibiotic, strongly astringent, haemostatic and hypoglycaemic. It is used in the treatment of diarrhoea, dysentery, irritable bowel syndrome, colitis, ulcerative colitis etc. Externally, the plant makes a good styptic for cuts etc., and a strongly made decoction has been recommended as a wash for mouth ulcers, infected gums, piles and inflamed eyes. Extracts are used to treat chapping of the anus and cracked nipples. The plant's effectiveness as a toothache remedy is undeniable and it has also been of benefit in treating bed-wetting by children.
The bloodroot or upright cinquefoil is very diverse with 4 varieties and widespread throughout Europe and northern Asia, probably migrated in eastern North America. It grows as a Rhizomstaude on wet and dry meadows, on heaths and in forests. A rhizome (rhizome) is an underground sprout part from which the plant expels after the winter and thus secures its existence. From the rootstock, many small roots grow deeper into the soil. The rootstock (the rhizome) of the bloodroot is nodular to cylindrical, outside dark brown and runs on the cut surfaces quickly reddish. When dry, the rootstock is reddish brown, which has earned the plant the name "bloodroot"

Seed - sow early spring or autumn in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is better to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a cold frame until they are well established before planting them out in late spring or early summer.


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