Goldenseal Bareroot (Hydrastis canadensis) Also known as Yellow root,

$ 7.95
SKU P9854S
Size

Medicinal Native American Herb !
PLEASE USE DROP DOWN BOX TO ORDER !

Ground raspberry, Orange root, Puccoon, and Wild curcumaGoldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) is native to northeastern United States and the southeastern Canada. It is also known as Yellow root, Ground raspberry, Orange root, Puccoon, and Wild curcuma. The plant is a perennial herb under the buttercup family Ranunculaceae. It is a small plant that has a single hairy stem and two five lobed, pointy leaves, small flowers, with raspberry-like fruit. The bitter tasting bulb, or root, is bright yellow or brown, wrinkled, and bent. Goldenseal was traditionally used by Native Americans to treat skin disorders, liver conditions, digestive problems, diarrhea, and eye irritations.
Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in part shade. Prefers well-composted soils with lots of leaf mold.
Planting Goldenseal Roots: Best to plant dormant live roots in the fall for emergence in the spring. May be planted in woodlands, shade garden or in pots. Prefers dappled sunlight over complete shade. Grows best in woodlands under the shade of hardwood trees, not conifers. Choose a place with deep, humusy soil. Organic compost may be added to poor soil in order to improve growth of Goldenseal, but if the soil is already a deep forest loam then amending with compost is not necessary. Rake away existing mulch and plant root in the mineral soil, just below the surface, buds up, buds barely covered by mineral soil. Spread out rootlets below rhizome and tamp in firmly. Then cover with mulch, about 2 inches deep of mulch. Regular forest mulch, rotted leaves, or coir work well. Commercial bark mulch is not a good choice.

Highly valued for it's herbal properties, Goldenseal has become a threatened native plant in some areas due to the over-collection of it's rhizomes. Prized more for it's medicinal value than it's beauty, this wildflower bears one, small, rather inconspicuous white flower, which then gives way to an attractive, but inedible cluster of scarlet berries. The early Americans used the rootstock for a variety of purposes, including tonic, diuretic, an insect repellent, and yellow dye! All parts of this plant are poisonous if ingested in large doses. Overall, care should be exercised, not only for your own sa

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