Red Rubin Basil Herb seeds (Ocimum basilicum purpurascens) organically Grown !

$ 1.97
SKU P12686S
Size

Basil Seeds,a beautiful addition to the garden and landscape.Red basil provides height, color, and flavor in a patio-side garden bed

  • High Quality, Untreated, Open pollinated Garden Seeds. Great in containers, Red Basil Seeds,a beautiful addition to the garden and landscape.Purple basil provides height, color, and flavor in a patio-side garden bed.
    Red Rubin Basil Seeds . The Best Red for Vinegars and Oils!
    Excellent choice for microgreens. The mature leaves are deep red-purple color and pink flowers. Strong basil flavor. Use as garnish, drinks, salad, pesto, salad, almost everything.
  • Great in containers,can Grow as ornamental
  • Good choice as microgreens packed with lots of flavor.
  • Use as garnish, drinks, salad, pesto, salad, almost everything.
  • Pinching out the leaves keeps growth more compact and pinching the flowers heads also helps extend the harvesting period.
  • Produces delicate purple flowers
  • Excellent in teas, said to be a digestive aid and to repel flying insects
  • Seeds per Ounce: 21,000

Red basil? Also known as Red Rubin basil, red basil (Ocimum basilicum purpurascens) is a compact basil plant with handsome reddish-purple foliage and a delightful aroma. The small pink flowers are an added bonus in mid- to late summer. Want to learn more about growing Red Rubin basil? Read on! How to Grow Red Rubin Basil Plants Red basil plants add beauty and interest to the garden. Plant red basil in containers or tuck a few in a bed along with other annuals. The plant is ornamental and the leaves can be used for cooking or to make flavored vinegars. The flavor is a bit more pungent than other types of basil, so use it sparingly. Red Rubin basil is easy to grow from seed after all danger of frost has passed in spring, or plant seeds indoors six to eight weeks ahead of time. Alternatively, propagate Red Rubin basil by taking stem cuttings from an existing plant
Excellent in teas, said to be a digestive aid and to repel flying insects
Maturity: Approx. 70-80 days
Planting season: Late spring/summer
Delicious in fish, poultry, pasta and rice dishes. Use in authentic Vietnamese, Cambodian or Thai dishes, such as pho, the famous noodle soup of Vietnam.
In Greek and Roman cultures, however, basil represented hate and misfortune; because of this, gardeners would often shout abuses at their plants to help them grow.
Sowing: Since basil thrives in warm weather, it grows best when the soil has warmed and there is no chance of frost. Gardeners with short growing seasons may want to start their seeds indoors 3-4 weeks before the last frost date, sowing them thinly in flats and providing heat to speed germination. Transplant 15-18" apart. To direct sow, plant the seeds 1/4" deep in rich soil and full sun, thinning to 15-18" apart when the seedlings develop. Basil also grows well indoors or as a container plant.

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Growing: Basil thrives in soil that drains well, yet needs water often. If the weather drops below 50 degrees, provide protection. As the plant grows, pruning it helps it to develop into a bushy, healthy plant; pruning is also important because once the plant flowers, it will begin to wilt and die. To prune the plant, remove the top several sets of leaves on each stem, taking care to leave at least three sets of leaves on the lower part.

Harvesting: Basil leaves can be harvested as soon as they reach a height of 6-8". The best time to harvest the leaves is in the morning after the dew dries. After the plant is established, harvesting often actually improves production; once the flowers develop, however, the leaves grow bitter to the taste. Remove single leaves or parts of a stem as needed, taking care to leave at least three sets of leaves on the length of the stem for healthy growth. When harvesting, pinch off the stem directly above the next set of leaves. Fresh basil will keep for several days at room temperature, with the stems in a glass of water; if refrigerated, it tends to wilt and turn brown. Basil also freezes and dries well. Since the water content of basil is very high and it can mold easily, the best method for drying is a dehydrator, an oven, or a similar dry, warm location.

Seed Saving: After the flowers have finished blooming, the seeds will begin to develop. Harvest the clusters of pods when they turn brown, and spread them out to dry in a protected location away from direct sunlight. Thresh the heads to remove the seed, and clean out as much of the chaff as possible. Store the seeds in a cool, dry place.
Sowing: Since basil thrives in warm weather, it grows best when the soil has warmed and there is no chance of frost. Gardeners with short growing seasons may want to start their seeds indoors 3-4 weeks before the last frost date, sowing them thinly in flats and providing heat to speed germination. Transplant 15-18" apart. To direct sow, plant the seeds 1/4" deep in rich soil and full sun, thinning to 15-18" apart when the seedlings develop. Basil also grows well indoors or as a container plant.Important, Please Read
All seeds have been test sown to ensure germination. Please familiarize yourself with growing conditions and instructions for your seeds before you plant them, as all seeds are different. Basic growing instructions can be found in detail section of each listing.
We Cannot Guarantee how much you will be able to grow, as too many variables come into play, soil condition, your ability to garden, weather etc. I guarantee that they arrive as described and are in good viable condition and the germination rates are accurate.

 

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