Calla Lilies Picasso (2 bulbs ) Exelent for Pots and Planters

Caribbeangardenseed

$ 8.99 

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You can look up your climate zone here: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/

Calla Lily

Calla (Zantedeschia) lilies are extraordinary flowers, Native to Southern Africa, and are grown from rhizomes. They can be grown in beds, borders, in containers and indoors in a sunny window. Perfect for a cutting garden and beautiful indoors in your nicest vases. Picasso produces striking, purple-white flowers.

Very popular cut flower, coveted by florists
Trumpet shaped blooms 2 in. to 3 in. across
Enjoy as a house plant
Bulb size 14 cm to 16 cm
Callas can be grown in beds, borders, in containers or as cut flowers and even indoors in a sunny window
Picasso produces striking purple white flowers
Plant after threat of frost has passed
Easy to grow callas, they prefer loose well-drained soil, planted in full sun or partial shade in warmer climates, plant after threat of frost has passed, the eyes or growing points should be facing upwards when planted, water liberally during the growing season as they should not be dry at any time, 3-bulbs will usually fit a 10 in. to 12 in. pot
Calla bulbs are only summer hardy, so be prepared to dig them up in fall or treat them as an annual in areas receiving frost 

Outdoor Beds
Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2"-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Callas thrive in average to moist soil but will not survive in soggy settings.
Site your callas where they'll receive full sun to bright filtered light.

Dig holes and plant the callas shallowly, so the tops of the tubers are exposed. Look for the sides of the tubers that appears to have the most "eyes" or growing points, which look much like the eyes on a potato. Plant the tubers with the eyes facing up.

After planting, water your callas generously to settle the soil around the tubers. Roots and sprouts will form in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperatures. (If temperatures are still cool in your area, wait until they warm before planting. Or start your tubers indoors in a pot for earlier blooms. Callas sulk in cold soil.)
Water your callas enough to keep the soil slightly damp but never enough for it to be soggy.
When in bloom, feel free to cut calla lily flowers for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and having graceful, long lasting blooms to bring indoors is one of the best reasons to grow these beauties.
After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place, don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year's show. Water as needed. Leaves may be removed when they yellow. (In cold areas, to save your calla tubers for next year, dig them after the first frost. Let the tubers air dry for several days. Then store in a cool location in paper bags or boxes filled with peat moss.)
Your callas will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.

Planters, Pots, Tubs and Urns
Fill your containers with good quality, well-drained soil. Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes; calla tubers must never sit in waterlogged soil or they will rot. Keep in mind the mature size of the varieties you have chosen and plan your container sizes accordingly.
Feel free to mix callas with other plants in the same container. Just keep in mind that all must have the same light and water needs.
Dig holes and plant the callas shallowly, so the tops of the tubers are exposed. Look for the sides of the tubers that appears to have the most "eyes" or growing points, which look much like the eyes on a potato. Plant the tubers with the eyes facing up.
After planting, water your callas generously to settle the soil around the tubers. Roots and sprouts will form in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperatures. (If temperatures are still cool in your area, wait until they warm before planting. Or start your tubers indoors in a pot for earlier blooms. Callas sulk in cold soil.)
Water your callas enough to keep the soil slightly damp but never enough for it to be soggy.
When in bloom, feel free to cut calla lily flowers for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and having graceful, long lasting blooms to bring indoors is one of the best reasons to grow these beauties.
After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place, don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year's show. Water as needed. Leaves may be removed when they yellow. (In cold areas, to save your calla tubers for next year, dig them after the first frost. Let the tubers air dry for several days. Then store in a cool location in paper bags or boxes filled with peat moss.)
Your callas will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.

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