American Cranberry seeds - Vaccinium macrocarpon - used in a variety of sauces

Vaccinium macrocarpon

$ 1.61 

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  1. Vaccinium macrocarpon
    Plant
  2. Vaccinium macrocarpon is a cranberry of the subgenus Oxycoccus and genus Vaccinium. It is native to North America. Vaccinium macrocarpon is the major source of cultivated cranberries.
  3. Cranberries are a tart, red berry most commonly used in a variety of sauces, pies and juices. They are also a popular addition to salads and are eaten in dried form as a snack. In recent years, cranberries have also become well-known for their healing qualities, due in large part to their high concentration of vitamin C and antioxidants. Most commonly grown commercially, cranberries can also be grown at home

Vaccinium macrocarpon American Cranberry This is the cranberry of holiday sauces, bread and jelly. Dense low lustrous evergreen ground cover, reddish purple in fall and loaded with large red berries. Once established, makes a beautiful and edible “lawn.” Handpick or rake like blueberries before hard frost. Use fresh, freeze or store in a cool basement or root cellar for months. Bitter and alkalizing effects make it one of the most common remedies for bladder infections. An excellent source of vitamin C. Annually flooded for frost protection and harvesting convenience in commercial operations, but not necessary in home plots. Self-fertile. Native to northeastern U.S. and Canada.

How to Plant Cranberry Seeds

Step 1

Fill 3- or 4-inch wide pots with enough lime-free sterilized growing medium to fill the pots to within about 1/4 of an inch from the top of the rim.

Step 2

Firm down the soil in each of the planting pots using your fingers, a piece of wood or a metal spoon. Transfer all the pots into an irrigation or watering tray. The tray should be able to hold about 2 inches of water.

Step 3

Pour enough water into the tray so the growing medium in the pots will soak up the water and become well-moistened. Pack the soil down one final time. Pour out the remainder of the water, if there is any.

Step 4

Poke two to three 1/4-inch-deep holes in each pot. Drop two cranberry seeds into each of the holes. Sprinkle over the top of each pair of seeds approximately 1/4 inch of the growing media.

Step 5

Place the tray of pots in a location in your home that will stay consistently around 65 to 70 degrees F for four weeks. Provide as much bright light as possible but, if possible, not direct sunlight. Keep the growing medium moist in each of the pots; add water to the tray as needed.

Step 6

Transfer the tray of pots into a location where the temperature will be between 25 and 40 degrees F for six weeks. Maintain the moisture levels by adding water to the tray when required. The temperature change is beneficial to hasten germination.

Step 7

Put the tray of pots into an area where the temperature will stay fairly consistent between 40 and 55 degrees F. Leave the tray of pots in this location for germinating the cranberry seeds. Germination of cranberry seeds can begin in as little as three weeks, or can take several months. Transplant the cranberry seedlings into their permanent location outside after they've become well-established.

Things You'll Need

  • Cranberry seeds
  • 3- or 4-inch wide pots
  • Sterilized growing media
  • Spoon
  • Watering tray




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