Tulip Bulbs, Blue Parrot, Fall Planting Bulbs.

Blue Parrot

$ 9.50 

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 Tulip,Blue Parrot

Blue Parrot tulips are among the most spectacular tulips to be found and this remarkable, truly blue variety is no exception to the rule. The big, beautiful blooms open fully in the sunlight revealing shades of blue that range from midnight to sky blue
ALL ABOUT TULIPS
Tulips are the most colorful of all spring flowers. They bloom in as many brilliant colors as a gardener could desire. Their beauty is timeless and they are also one of the easiest flowers to grow. Just plant the bulbs in the fall for flowers the following spring. Tulips come in enough colors, shapes, sizes and bloom times to inspire every gardener’s creativity. Tulips can be grown in flowerbeds and borders, in containers and in cutting gardens. Whether they're planted in groups of 10 or 10,000, tulips always put on an impressive show.

ENTRYWAYS & BORDERS:

Planting tulips in flower beds and borders lets you start enjoying a colorful garden long before most perennials have emerged from their winter sleep. Welcome guests by planting a bed of tulips along your front walk. For mass plantings, you can count on the large flowers of Darwin Hybrid Tulips to always provide a big impact.
PLANTING IS AS EASY AS 1, 2, 3
1. Dig a hole 6” deep.
2. Set the tulip bulb pointy side up in the soil.
3. Cover the bulb with soil and water only if the soil is very dry.
PLANTING TIPS
Planting tulips side by side in a single row makes them look stiff and unnatural. Tulips look best when they are planted in informal groups of 5 or more bulbs. Rectangular, triangular or oval patterns (as shown in the photo at left) will make the planting look as full as possible and ensure the flowers are visible from all angles.
For best results, tulips should be planted in well-drained soil. Peat moss or compost can be added to improve drainage. Tulip bulbs should be planted pointy side up. If you are unsure which end should face up, plant the bulbs on their sides. Once the bulb starts growing, the plant will find its way to the sun.
CUT FLOWER GARDENS: Enjoy the fun of arranging bouquets of tulips for your own home or to share with friends and family. Planting bulbs in a cutting garden makes it easier to cut the flowers and bring the freshness of spring indoors. For cutting gardens, plant an assortment of different tulip flower types, including singles, doubles, fringed, lily-flowered and parrots.
CURB APPEAL: Increase the WOW factor around your home! Large groups of colorful tulips will attract the admiring eyes of neighbors and everyone who passes by. The more tulips you plant, the better the show. Darwin Hybrid tulips offer a wide range of color choices and have large, impressive blooms.
CONTAINERS & WINDOW BOXES: When fall arrives, remove the annuals and fill your pots and planters with tulip bulbs. The bulbs will sleep through the winter months and then fill your yard with a burst of spring color. Greigii tulips and double early tulips are especially good for containers.
COMPANION PLANTS FOR TULIPS
For a vibrant display of spring color, pair tulips with other spring-blooming bulbs such as hyacinths, daffodils and crocus. Grow a carpet of color beneath your tulips by under-planting them with anemone blanda or muscari, or with early spring annuals such as pansies. Primroses, dicentra, hosta, pulmonaria and other spring-blooming perennials make lovely companions for tulips, and will fill in the flower beds once the tulips have finished flowering.
Outdoor Beds
Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still puddles of water 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2 - 3 inches to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available.
Plant your tulips where they will get full sun to light shade. Keep in mind that for tulips to return in subsequent springs they will need a period of winter cooling. This happens easily in northern areas and will occur to the cooler parts of zone 8. (Some bulb sellers suggest that tulips will return after growing the year round warmth of zone 9. Sadly, it's just wishful thinking.)
Plant tulips 5" apart and 6" to 7" deep at the base. Deeper planting depths are better in colder regions. Position the bulbs with the pointy end facing up.
After planting, water well once, gently soaking the soil to settle it around the roots. Roots will form in the autumn. Foliage and flowers will develop in the spring.
When in bloom, feel free to cut tulips for striking bouquets.
After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulb for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
By the early summer the leaves will yellow and die back. The dried foliage may be removed at this point. Your bulbs will rest until next spring when they'll beginning the next growing cycle. When leaves are absent and the bulbs are dormant, withhold water.
Pots, Barrels, Tubs & Urns
Start with containers of good quality, well-drained soil. Tulips that sit in water logged soil will rot. Shorter varieties usually perform better in all but the largest containers.
Plant your tulips where they will get full sun to light shade. Keep in mind that for tulips to return in subsequent springs they will need a period of winter cooling. This happens easily in northern areas and will occur to the cooler parts of zone 8. (Some bulb sellers suggest that tulips will return after growing the year round warmth of zone 9. Sadly, it's just wishful thinking.)
Plant tulips 4" apart and 6" to 7" deep at the base. Deeper planting depths are better in colder regions. Position the bulbs with the pointy end facing up.
After planting, water well once, gently soaking the soil to settle it around the roots. Roots will form in the autumn. Foliage and flowers will develop in the spring.
When in bloom, feel free to cut tulips for striking bouquets.
After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulb for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
By the early summer the leaves will yellow and die back. The dried foliage may be removed at this point. Your bulbs will rest until next spring when they'll beginning the next growing cycle. When leaves are absent and the bulbs are dormant, withhold water.

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