Sweet Pepper Seed 'Lombardo Pepperoncini'- C.annuum - Italian pickling pepper

$ 6.65
SKU P6638S
Size





Heirloom Seed VarietyGMO FreeOpen Pollinated Variety

Our Pepper seeds are rare originals passed down over generations to be pure, Non-GMO seeds you can count on.

Pepper- Peperone Lombardo
Product Description
sweet; Peperoncini Type; 5 to 6 inches long by 0.75 to 1 inches wide; medium thick flesh; matures from pale green to red; pendant pods; green leaves; 18 to 24 inches tall; Mid Season (70-80 days); Uses: Drying, Pickling, Fried/Stir-Fried; from Italy; C.annuum. 

Peppers have been cultivated in Central and South America, Mexico and the West Indies since ancient times, but it was early explorers like Columbus who brought the pepper to Europe. They became popular and were then brought to North America with the first European colonists.

Peppers are tropical plants that are grown as warm season annuals here. Given plenty of sun, peppers are relatively easy to grow. Plant them in well-draining soil with plenty of organic matter. Of course, it depends upon the pepper variety, but most peppers should be spaced about 12-16 inches apart.

Germination Info Start seeds in small containers from 8-10 weeks prior to the last frost date. Plant seeds approximately 1/4-1/2" deep in moist, well drained potting soil. Most standard soil mixes are suitable for pepper seeds. Soil temperature must be kept at 75-90F for proper germination. Cool soil, particularly at night can inhibit or significantly delay germination. To keep soil temperature warm, start seeds indoors, in a greenhouse and/or use a seed starting heat mat. Keep soil moderately moist, though not overly, dripping wet. Water soil when the soil surface just begins to dry. Allow proper air circulation for containers.
Optionally, seeds can be dipped in a dilute hydrogen peroxide mix (1 tsp hydrogen peroxide per cup water) for one minute to disinfect seeds prior to planting. If your soil or seed setup is susceptible to mold growth this can be useful to kill mold spores. 
Once seedlings have sprouted, keep in small containers until a few sets of leaves have developed. Transplant to larger containers or outdoors. If transplanting outdoors, make sure to harden off seedlings by exposing them to only filtered sunlight for up to 1-2 weeks. Thin plants to 3-4 ft and rows to 6-10 ft.
Estimated germination time under optimal conditions: 4-10 weeks

How to Pick a Pepper

Harvesting sweet pepper varieties requires some finesse, as the delicate branches will break if you tug at them. Use hand pruners, scissors or a sharp knife to remove the pepper from the plant.

When harvesting hot peppers, use gloves or wash your hands immediately after picking the fruit. Do not touch your eyes or mouth after harvesting or the capsaicin oil, which is probably on your hands, will undoubtedly burn you.

Pepper Plants After Harvest

Peppers can be stored in the refrigerator for 7-10 days or at 45 degrees F. (7 C.) with an 85-90% relative humidity. Make them into salsas, add them to soups or salads, roast them, stuff them, dry them or pickle them. You can also wash, cut and freeze peppers for future use.

Once the pepper plant has been harvested in most areas, it is finished for the season and the plant will die back during the late fall. In regions with year-round warm temps, however, the pepper may continue to produce, just as it does in the tropical regions of its origin.

You can also over winter a pepper plant by bringing it indoors. The key to over wintering is warmth and light. It is possible to keep a pepper for many years in this manner. Many pepper plants are quite ornamental and will continue to fruit indoors and make a lovely addition to the home décor.

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