10 Baccato de orto, Pepper seed,capsicum baccatum, From Italy.

n/a

$ 3.14 

Add to Wishlist

We are well known for selling Heirloom, non-treated, non-GMO, tested seeds!
  • · Pure, organic, heirloom seeds
  • · Grown and hand packed in the USA
  • Untreated, Non-GMO, Pesticide Free

variated leaves and produce stunning purple flowers. A real eye catcher,Certified Organic.

Grow heirloom peppers – Red Cherry Sweet Pepper Seeds:
Compact plants produce loads of stuffable, grillable peppers.
Very pungent.Very productive plant. Good taste, and sharp bite.Fruity delicate Aroma.Late season great for overwintering.
1
Mix equal parts potting soil, compost, perlite and sphagnum moss. Fill a 12-inch pot 3/4 full with the mixture. The pot should have adequate drainage. Start seeds two months before the planting season. Sow seeds on the surface and cover with a sprinkling of soil. Cover the seeds with plastic and keep them in a south-facing window. Mist the soil to keep it moist.
2
Plant seedlings in time to put them out after the last frost. When planting seedlings, place the plant in the center of the pot and cover the roots with soil. Water thoroughly and add more soil if necessary.
3
Place the potted pepper in full sun. Set a small tomato cage -- 2 to 3 feet high -- over the pot to support the plant as it grows. Water the pepper daily if necessary to keep the soil moist.
4
Fertilize every two weeks with half-strength liquid tomato fertilizer beginning when blooms appear.
5
Harvest the peppers as soon as they ripen to keep the plant producing. Once the pepper turns dark orange or red it is ripe. Cut the pepper from the plant just above the fruit. Peppers left on the plant too long will develop a hotter flavor.
6
Overwinter the plants for the next year. In the fall when the leaves begin to drop, cut the plant back to 3 or 4 inches above the soil line. Place the container in a cool, dark room and leave it until the spring, after frost danger has passed.
All pepper varieties are Heirloom and/or OP(Open Pollinated.) and Organically Grown.
Growing Peppers: 
Peppers, like tomatoes, grow in well-drained fertile soil
Almost all peppers have the same requirements for successful growth. Plant them in good, well-drained, fertile soil – and make sure they get lots of sunlight and a good inch of water per week. In many ways, they mimic the same requirements needed for growing great tomatoes.
At Planting Time:
We plant all of our peppers with a good shovel full of compost in the planting hole, and then give them a good dose of compost tea every few weeks for the first 6 weeks of growth. We also mulch around each of our pepper plants with a good 1 to 2″ thick layer of compost.
All pepper varieties are Heirloom and/or OP(Open Pollinated.) and Organically Grown
Peppers often like to take their sweet time germinating. They can be up in a week, and some will take almost a month. Even with paper towel germination testing, they can take long. I am not sure why, but it is a normal occurrence. So plan and make sure you start them early enough! Also, remember they like heat to germinate so make sure you have a heating mat or something to keep the soil warm. Placing them up on top of the fridge often works too since it is normally warmer up there.
Peppers do very well grown in pots.

 

Our brands